Featured Pathways

More pathways

The Science of Climate Change

Climate change is no longer a distant threat or just a possibility, it is now a reality for all of us. In this pathway, Kevin Trenberth, a renowned climatologist, delves into the science behind climate change. He first introduces the climate system, its main components and forces.

Tackling the Plastic Crisis

Plastic pollution is by far the biggest threat to our oceans and this remains an incredibly tough problem to solve. Plastic credits could potentially serve as one of the much needed solutions for this crisis.

More pathways

Ready to get started?

PLANS & MEMBERSHIP

Our Platform

Expert led content

+1,000 expert presented, on-demand video modules

Learning analytics

Keep track of learning progress with our comprehensive data

Interactive learning

Engage with our video hotspots and knowledge check-ins

Testing & certification

Gain CPD / CPE credits and professional certification

Managed learning

Build, scale and manage your organisation’s learning

Integrations

Connect Sustainability Unlocked to your current platform

Featured Content

More featured content

The Scale of the Net Zero Challenge

The price of meeting net zero is estimated to be between $100-150 trillion over the next 30 years. Regardless of this cost, we need to reach net zero before climate change does irreversible damage to the environment and the economy.

ESG, Sustainability and Impact Jargon Buster

ESG, sustainability, impact… they all just mean green, right? Not quite. Despite being used often interchangeably, there are distinct differences between these terms.

More featured content

Ready to get started?

Featured Pathways

More pathways

The Science of Climate Change

Climate change is no longer a distant threat or just a possibility, it is now a reality for all of us. In this pathway, Kevin Trenberth, a renowned climatologist, delves into the science behind climate change. He first introduces the climate system, its main components and forces.

Tackling the Plastic Crisis

Plastic pollution is by far the biggest threat to our oceans and this remains an incredibly tough problem to solve. Plastic credits could potentially serve as one of the much needed solutions for this crisis.

More pathways

Ready to get started?

PLANS & MEMBERSHIP

Our Platform

Expert led content

+1,000 expert presented, on-demand video modules

Learning analytics

Keep track of learning progress with our comprehensive data

Interactive learning

Engage with our video hotspots and knowledge check-ins

Testing & certification

Gain CPD / CPE credits and professional certification

Managed learning

Build, scale and manage your organisation’s learning

Integrations

Connect Sustainability Unlocked to your current platform

Featured Content

More featured content

The Scale of the Net Zero Challenge

The price of meeting net zero is estimated to be between $100-150 trillion over the next 30 years. Regardless of this cost, we need to reach net zero before climate change does irreversible damage to the environment and the economy.

ESG, Sustainability and Impact Jargon Buster

ESG, sustainability, impact… they all just mean green, right? Not quite. Despite being used often interchangeably, there are distinct differences between these terms.

More featured content

Ready to get started?

Ready to get started?

Tracking and Measuring Human Rights Risks

Tracking and Measuring Human Rights Risks

Kate Larsen

20 years: Human Rights and Supply Chains

In this video, Kate talks about what’s expected of businesses in taking action on salient human rights impacts, and how to measure and communicate human rights improvements.

In this video, Kate talks about what’s expected of businesses in taking action on salient human rights impacts, and how to measure and communicate human rights improvements.

Speak to an expert

Speak to an expert today to access this and all of the content on our platform.

Tracking and Measuring Human Rights Risks

13 mins 5 secs

Key learning objectives:

  • Outline investor expectations for business actions on human rights impacts

  • Understand the impact of global initiatives on workplace safety and worker rights

Overview:

Businesses are expected to take decisive action on human rights impacts, involving engagement with rights-holder representatives, understanding root causes, and implementing responsible practices through appropriate pricing and training. This includes investigating issues thoroughly, tracking progress, and reporting on improvements. Effective actions may involve improving wages, remediating child labor, and enhancing workplace safety. Transparency in reporting and adherence to human rights due diligence legislation are crucial. The focus extends to how companies integrate these practices into their operations and value chains to ensure comprehensive human rights risk management.

Speak to an expert

Speak to an expert today to access this and all of the content on our platform.

Summary
How should investors expect businesses to take action on salient human rights impacts?

Investors should expect businesses to show how they have listened to rights-holder representatives and understood the issues. This includes considering if and how they might have contributed to the problem, such as driving prices down too far or placing excessive pressure on suppliers. Businesses should engage with their teams, suppliers, and business partners to clarify expectations, provide training, influence, support, and reward compliance or improvements. They should continuously look for ways to improve efforts, such as adopting more responsible purchasing practices and ensuring proper selection of suppliers and business partners.

How can businesses measure and communicate human rights improvements?

Businesses can measure and communicate human rights improvements by tracking the progress of their actions over time and reporting on this progress to a range of stakeholders. This can involve reporting on safer workplaces, the input of worker voices through trade unions, and assessments and guidance to suppliers. For example, after the Rana Plaza Factory collapse, the accord on fire and building safety led to significant improvements. Companies should also consider root causes of adverse human rights impacts, such as land taken from indigenous groups without consent, and report on their efforts to mitigate or avoid these issues.

How should companies report on their human rights due diligence efforts?

Companies should report on their human rights due diligence efforts by detailing:
- Risk mapping and research
- Engagement with potentially vulnerable stakeholders
- Outcomes and learnings from engagements
- Training and support provided to employees, partners, and suppliers
- Assessments and monitoring, including types of issues found and root causes
- Actions taken to influence remediation and the extent of its effectiveness
- Policy improvements and public commitments

Speak to an expert

Speak to an expert today to access this and all of the content on our platform.

Kate Larsen

Kate Larsen

Kate Larsen is a Director at SupplyESChange advising and training Investors and Companies on Environmental and Social issues of ESG, especially, human rights risk management in global supply chains. She has worked over 20 years on supply chain ESG including leading Asia Corporate Responsibility in the UK FTSE100 company Burberry and as a Global Director Responsible Sourcing in a US Nasdaq listed retailer.

There are no available Videos from "Kate Larsen"